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Wildlife
Arctic Tern
The arctic tern sees more sun than any other animal as it has two summers every year due to it migrating around 70,900km from Iceland to the Antarctic coast.
Grey Seal
The Grey seal, or gray seal in American English, is often found, in coastal waters of the northern hemisphere. It is a true seal, as supposed to an eared one, and known for its friendly, inquisitive nature towards humans people.
White Tailed Sea Eagle
The white tailed eagle was almost made extinct in Iceland, with only 20 mating pairs being recorded in the 1960s. This was due to hunting, with a bounty on their feathery heads until 1905, which dropped their numbers to fewer than 100 eagles.
Humpback whale
Humpback whales are a baleen whale, and known for their incredible breaching displays and heartbreakingly beautiful vocalisations. They are found all around the world, however have different mating groups, which results in different markings around the world.
Killer Whale
The killer whale, or orca is the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family. It is a toothed whale, as supposed to a baleen whale, and as such the males grow larger than the females, the former up to about 8m and the latter to 6m.
Pilot Whale
Pilot whales have a bulbous head, more pronounced on older males, making them easy to identify within the pod. Their colouring is black or dark grey with a like grey anchor shaped mark on their underside.
Fin Whale
The fin whale is the second largest animal on the planet, after the blue whale, but despite it's size, up to 25metres it is one of the fastest cetaceans, swimming up to 29mph, earning it the nickname 'Greyhound of the sea.' It can swim fast due to it's long, slender, muscular body.
White-beaked dolphin
The killer whale, or orca is the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family. It is a toothed whale, as supposed to a baleen whale, and as such the males grow larger than the females, the former up to about 8m and the latter to 6m.
Atlantic Puffin
60% of the world's Atlantic puffins come to Iceland to breed. Known for their colourful beaks and clumsy behaviour they are beloved by Icelanders and tourists alike.
Harbour Seal
The harbour seal is often found, as its name suggests, in coastal waters of the northern hemisphere. It is also referred to as the common seal, and is a true seal, as supposed to eared. Known for their friendly, inquisitive nature towards humans people sometimes refer to them as sea-dogs.
Blue Whale
In the North Atlantic, the body of water around Iceland, there is thought to be at least 1000 individuals, and on a very special Independence day in 2019 two of them came to play with our yacht, rolling on their backs, blowing bubbles and circling us.
Harbour Porpoise
We find harbour porpoises regularly and we take them as a good omen as they are often spotted in areas we have seen baleen whales, especially near minke whales. They are one of the smallest marine mammals, being between 1.4 to 1.9metres, and are found, as the name suggests, close to land, but as well as in coastal waters they will swim up rivers in land.
Minke whale
The Minke whale is the second smallest baleen whale in the world, after the pygmy right whale. Once sexually mature the females average about 8m in length, and the male is smaller, like all baleen whales, at only 6.9m.
Sea birds in Iceland
The seabirds we frequently see on our tours have a special place in our hearts, not just because they tell us the seasons, like the raucous Arctic Tern filling our skies in the summer months, but because they help us find the whales we adore so much.
Basking Shark
The killer whale, or orca is the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family. It is a toothed whale, as supposed to a baleen whale, and as such the males grow larger than the females, the former up to about 8m and the latter to 6m.
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